John Herbert WILLIAMS

John Herbert WILLIAMS

Male 1925 - 2005

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  • Name  John Herbert WILLIAMS  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Born  7 Dec 1925  New Orleans, Orleans Par., Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 6
    Gender  Male 
    Died  28 Jun 2005  Pass Christian, Harrison Co., Mississippi, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    • Obituary:

      "J. Herbert Williams, a stockbroker, civic leader, long time resident of New Orleans and a man with a poem for every occasion, died Tuesday, June 28, 2005 after a long illness at his home in Pass Christian, Mississippi, at the age of 79.

      "Mr. Williams was graduate of New Orleans Academy and Tulane University, where he became a lifelong Sigma Chi. He was in the Navy R.O.T.C. from 1943 to 1945 and served in the Pacific aboard the destroyer escort USS Paul G. Baker from 1945 to 1947. He earned an engineering degree in 1948 and began his long career as a stockbroker in New Orleans. The Korean War saw him serving as an officer in the US Navy in 1951-52 on the destroyer escort USS Marsh off the coast of Korea.

      "Returning to New Orleans and the investment business for the next forty-three years, he was a vice president of E.F. Hutton and promoted ethical practices among stockbrokers as a member of the Business Conduct Committee of the National Association of Securities Dealers.

      "He served on the Metropolitan Crime commission, the United Way as a vice president, as president of the Orleans Neighborhood Centers, on the board of the Louise S. McGehee School, and as chairman of the YWCA capital campaign. For twenty-seven years he was a director of the Society for the Relief of Destitute Orphan Boys (Waldo Burton Home), serving as vice president before retiring emeritus in 2001. He was a member of the vestry and senior warden of Trinity Episcopal Church in New Orleans and served on the Board of Trustees of the Diocese of Louisiana for twenty years. In Pass Christian he served on the vestry of Trinity Church and devoted much of his time to the endowment committee for Live Oak Cemetery.

      "His interest in genealogy led him to keep extensive records of family history, traveling often to Great Britain to search cemeteries and churches and reunite long lost relatives with one another. He was president of the Caledonian Society of New Orleans and a board member of the Clan Munro Association of the USA.

      "He was also a member of the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of New Jersey and president of the Louisiana chapter of the Society from 2002 to 2004. He was a member of the Boston Club, the Recess Club, and Southern Yacht Club, Pass Christian Yacht Club and several carnival organizations.

      "Mr. Williams is survived by his wife, Noel Barnes Williams, his daughter, Catherine Packard Williams of Oakland, California, his sons, J. Herbert Williams, II of Ocala, Florida and wife Jennifer Salpeter Williams, and Eric Halsey Williams and wife Aline Whittaker Williams of New Orleans, six grandchildren, and a brother Frank Adair Monroe Williams.

      "A Memorial Service will be held at Trinity Church in Pass Christian on Thursday, Jun 30, 2005 at 11:30 a.m. Interment in Metairie Cemetery will be private. Memorial contributions preferred to Trinity Church, Corner Church and St. Louis Streets, Pass Christian, MS 39571 or the Live Oak Cemetery, Pass Christian, MS 39571 or the charity of your choice.

      "Riemann Funeral Home, Pass Christian, is in charge of arrangements, and an online guest book may be signed and viewed vie riemannfuneralhomes.com."
    Buried  30 Jun 2005  Metairie, Jefferson Par., Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    • Metairie Cemetery
    Person ID  I604  Munro
    Last Modified  11 Aug 2011 

    Father  George Elliot WILLIAMS,   b. 17 Sep 1885, Pass Christian, Harrison Co., Mississippi, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1947, New Orleans, Orleans Par., Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Adele MONROE,   b. 18 Jun 1888, New Orleans, Orleans Par., Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1982, New Orleans, Orleans Par., Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  7 Jun 1911 
    Family ID  F278  Group Sheet

    Family  Living 
    Children 
     1. Living
    >2. Living
    >3. Living
    Last Modified  11 May 2009 
    Family ID  F280  Group Sheet

  • Notes 
    • **********
      iJ. Herbert Williams, retired stockbroker
      Wednesday, June 29, 2005
      From staff reports

      J. Herbert Williams, a retired New Orleans stockbroker and civic leader, died Tuesday at his home in Pass Christian, Miss. He was 79.

      Mr. Williams was born in New Orleans and lived there until moving to Pass Christian in 1991.

      He graduated from New Orleans Academy and Tulane University, where he was a member of Sigma Chi fraternity.

      He was in the Navy ROTC from 1943 to 1945 and served in the Pacific aboard a destroyer escort from 1945 to 1947. After earning an engineering degree in 1948 and beginning his career as a stockbroker, he returned to the Navy during the Korean War, servind off the coast of Korea in 1951-52.

      Returning to New Orleans and the investment business for the next 43 years, Mr. Williams became a vice president of E.F. Hutton and promoted ethical practices among stockbrokers as a member of the Business Conduct committee of the National Association of Securities Dealers.

      He was a former member of the Metropolitan Crime Commission, vice president of the United Way, president of the Orleans Neighborhood Centers, board member of the Louise S. McGehee School and chairman of the YWCA's captial campaign.

      Mr. Williams was a director of the Society for the Relief of Destitute Orphan Boys, which operates the Waldo Burton Home, for 27 years.

      He was a vestry member and senior warden of Trinity Eposcopal Church in New Orleans and served on the board of trustees of the Episcopal Diocese of Louisiana for 20 years. In Pass Christian, he served on the vestry of Trinity Church and the endowment committee for Live Oak Cemetery.

      His interest in genealogy often took him to Great Britain to do research in cemeteries and churches. He was president of the Caledonian Society of New Orleans and a board member of the Clan Munro Association of the USA. He also was a prolific amateur poet.

      Mr. Williams was a member of the Society of the Cincinnati in New Jersey and president of the society's Louisiana chapter from 2002 to 2004. He was a member of the Boston Club, Recess Club, Southern Yacht Club, Pass Christian Yacht Club and several Carnival organizations.

      Survivors include his wife, Noel Barnes Williams; two sons, J. Herbert Williams II of Ocala, Fla., and Eric Halsey Williams of New Orleans; a daughter, Catherine Packard Williams of Oakland, Calif.; a brother, Frank Adair Monroe Williams; and six grandchildren.

      A memorial service will be held Thursday at 11:30 a.m. at Trinity Church in Pass Christian. Visitation will begin at 10 a.m. Burial in Metairie Cemetery will be private. Riemann Funeral Home in Pass Christian is in charge of arrangements./i

      (Obituary for J. Herbert Williams - Nola.com - 2 Jul 2005)
      **********
      iJ. Herbert Williams, a stockbroker, civic leader, long time resident of New Orleans, LA, and a man with a poem for every occasion, died Tuesday, June 28, 2005 after a long illness at his home in Pass Christian, Mississippi, at the age of 79. Mr. Williams was a graduate of New Orleans Academy and Tulane University, where he became a lifelong Sigma Chi. He was in the Navy R.O.T.C. from 1943 to 1945 and served in the Pacific aboard the destroyer escort USS Paul G. Baker from 1945 to 1947. He earned an engineering degree in 1948 and began his long career as a stockbroker in New Orleans. The Korean War saw him serving as an officer in the US Navy in 1951-52 on the destroyer escort USS Marsh off the coast of Korea.

      Returning to New Orleans and the investment business for the next forty-three years, he was a vice president of E. F. Hutton and promoted ethical practices among stockbrokers as a member of the Business Conduct Committee of the National Association of Securities Dealers. He served on the Metropolitan Crime Commission, the United Was as a vice president, as president of the Orleans Neighborhood Centers, on the board of the Louise S. McGehee School, and as chairman of the YWCA capital campaign. For twenty-seven years he was a director of the Society for the Relief of Destitute Orphan Boys (Waldo Burton Home), serving as vice president before retiring emeritus in 2001. He was a member of the vestry and senior warden of Trinity Episcopal Church in New Orleans and served on the Board of Trustees of the Diocese of Louisiana for twenty years. In Pass Christian he served on the vestry of Trinity Church and devoted much of his time to the endowment committee for Live Oak Cemetery.

      His interest in genealogy led him to keep extensive records of family history, traveling often to Great Britain to search cemeteries and churches and reunite long lost relatives with one another. He was president of the Caledonian Society of New Orleans and a board member of the Clan Munro Association of the USA. He was also a member of the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of New Jersey and president of the Louisiana chapter of the Society from 2002 to 2004. He was a member of the Boston Club, the Recess Club, the Southern yacht Club, Pass Christian Yacht Club and several carnival organizations.

      Mr. Williams is survived by his wife, Noel Barnes Williams; his daughter, Catherine packard Williams of Oakland, California, his sons, J. Herbert Williams II of Ocala, Florida and wife Jennifer Salpeter Williams and Eric halsey Williams and wife Aline Whittake Williams of New Orleans; six grandchildren; and a brother, Frank Adair Monroe Wiliams.

      A Memorial Service will be held at Trinity Church, Pass Christian, MS on Thursday, June 30, 2005 at 11:30 a.m. with visitation in the parish hall beginning at 10:a.m. Interment in Metairie Cemetery will be private. Memorial contributions preferred to Trinity Church, corner Church and St. Louise Streets, Pass Christian, MS 39571 or the charity of your choice. Riemann Funeral Home, Pass Christian, MS is in charge of arrangements, and an online guest book may be signed and viewed via riemannfuneralhomes.com./i

      (Obituary of J. Herbert Williams - "The Times-Picayune" - 29 Jun 2005 - 30 June 2005)
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      iAs some of you may know, Dad loved a celebration. In fact, he had a real talent for celebrating - a joie de vive. He celebrated life, and he celebrated the people around him. Which is why he hoped that today we would not be sad or mourn his death but rather would celebrate his living. And we certainly have a lot to celebrate.

      About 30 years ago, a friend came up to me and told me how lucky I was to have my dad as a father. He told me that dad was the first adult who ever talked to him like he too was an adult. I came to realize that dad made a lot of people feel that way. He knew how to make those around him feel special. He always had that big hello when you came in the door ... as only dad could do it. I was no longer just Herb - I became Herbert's elixer, or Catherine was Katrinka or Kutchinata, Eric was Eric the Red and mom was Noorah - and then there was alway maroo. God knows how many of us have been called maroo by dad at one time or another. But in this way, we all became larger by him. He made us all feel special.

      After that big hello dad would want to know how my corprosities were sagaciating ... if everything was soignee sauce picante mayonnaise bo bo wain (dad's way of speaking French); Then you had to wait for the sun to cross the yard arm, for the officer of the deck to strike eight bells and have a cold beer ... or a wee dram. Of course, behind all the kidding was a father who cared deeply and who always let us know he was there for us and that he loved us.

      My dad loved the characters of Damon Runyon because they were larger than life - guys like Harry the Horse, Spanish John and Little Isidore - sitting at Mindy's minding their own business. I'm sure that had Damon Runyon lived long enough he would have come up with a character like dad - Herbie the Hoss, wearing his straw caty, spoutin poetry and hanging out with characters like Harcourt the ape, Nigel the duck, Jim macaroni McMahon, Sweet Sidney Pugh and Billy the kid Scoggin.

      Dad believed you had to approach everything in life with passioin. I think he got some of that from his mother. At Mardi Gras you got in constume. At dances, you danced and made sure everyone else got to dance. He was passionate in his opinions of right and wrong and in his politics. We didn't have political discussions at the family dinner table (arguments, yes) but none of us were lacking for strong opinions.

      Dad loved every kind of celebration. One of his fondest memories was leading songs at the Sigma Chi house, balanced precariously on the newel post - kept aloft by the singing of his fraternity brothers and by way too many beers. He loved Mardi Gras, he loved birthdays and anniversaries - because celebrations usually meant poetry. Poetry is a thread running through our lives with dad. As children we learned life's lessons by hearing poems like the one by Edwin Markham which dad knew by rote and repeated time and time and time again. That one went:

      He drew a circle that shut me out,
      Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout,
      But love and I had wit to win;
      We drew a circle that took him in.

      Poetry found its way into every nook and cranny of life with dad. You couldn't ask for a knife in our house without him launching into:

      Please mother, don't stab father with the bread knife.
      Remember, 'twas a gift when you were wed.
      But if you must stab father with the bread knife,
      Please mother, use another for the bread.

      Dad was fortunate that he married a tolerant woman. But he knew that. Even smiling in our house was not without risk, because when - you wore a smile you could see a mile, you risked hearing all of the Cremation of Sam McGee. Where he said "Please close that door" but I'm told this is not the time or place for Sam McGee. Again, dad quoted all these poems from memory. Poetry gave my Dad a voice - a voice for celebrating family milestones; a voice for celebrating his devotion to friends; a voice to express the love he felt for his children and his grandchildren and his love for my mother. His poetry may not be Pulitzer prize material, but it was such a gift from him to all of us.

      In keeping with his love of poetry, Dad left me with one final request - to finish this with a poem written by Alfred Lord Tennyson. Tennyson wrote this poem in 1889 several years before he died, but he insisted that it be the final poem in any published collection of his works. Because like dad, he did not want his death to be mourned, he wanted his living to be celebrated.

      Crossing the Bar
      By Alfred Lord Tennyson

      Sunset and evening star,
      And one clear call for me!
      And may there be no moaning of the bar,
      When I put out to sea.

      but such a tide as moving seems asleep,
      Too full for sound and foam,
      When that which drew out from the boundless deep
      Turns again home.

      Twilight and evening bell,
      And after that the dark!
      And may there be no sadness of farewell,
      When I embark;

      For tho' from out our bourne of Time and Place
      The flood may take me far,
      I hope to see my Pilot face to face
      When I have crosst the bar./i

      (Eulogy of John Herbert Williams - by Herb Williams II - 30 Jun 2005)
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      iIsn't it amazing how much of Dad you see in Herb. That's a wonderful thing - very comforting to me

      In the last ten days I've had two speeding tickets, I've run out of gas, and I've run my new car into a steel beam. Aside from that, I've got everything under control.

      This last week - with the whole family of five together - it was precious for all of us. Dad was lucid most of the time, if a little subdued, and Catherine commented, "It was like he was boiled down to his essence - the things about him we loved the most."

      On Saturday night, he shared a dream with us, which was something he'd never done before, about his father George driving around in a sports car with a big shock of red hair flying in the breeze, looking to have some fun and maybe get into a little mischief with his friend Willie Henderson. It was a dream inspired by a conversation he had with Sam Labouisse a couple of days before. Sam remembered that George had one of the area's first "air cooled" automobiles and he loved putting the "pedal to the metal". Dad smiled broadly as he related his dream, and it seemed somehow to have reunited him with his father whom he respected so deeply.

      Later that same night we read dad a poem by Eugene Field that was one of his favoriees. It's a poem his mother used to read to him. When dad was five years old, he had his tonsils taken out, and he vividly recalled his stay in the hospital. his mother would visit him, and he would eat ice cream while she recited poetry. He had her full attention and she had his. It was a joyful memory. This little poem helps me remember both of them - and their rare dedication to the spirit of youth:

      In an ocean way out yonder (As all sapient people know),
      Is the land of Wonder-Wander, where the children love to go;
      It's their playing, romping, swinging, that give great joy to me
      While the Dinkey-Bird goes singing in the amfalula tree!

      For the Dinkey-Bird's bravuras and staccato's are so sweet --
      His roulades, appoggiaturas, and robustos so complete,
      That the youth of every nation -- be they near or far away --
      Have especial delectation in that gladsome roundelay.

      Their eyes grow bright and brighter, their lungs begin to crow,
      Their hearts get light and lighter, and their cheeks are all aglow;
      For an echo cometh bringing the news to all and me,
      That the Dinkey Bird is singing in the amfalula tree.

      I'm sure you'd like to go there to see your feathered friend --
      And so many goodies grow there you would like to comprehend!
      Speed, little dreams, your winging to that land across the sea
      Where the Dinkey-Bird is singing in the amfalula tree!/i

      (Eulogy of John Herbert Williams - by Eric Williams - 30 Jun 2005)
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      Ref: Clan Munro files - Kendall, Moyna Monroe
      Williams, John Herbert

      Compiled and edited by Allen Alger, Genealogist, Clan Munro Association, USA

  • Sources 
    1. [S344] Clan Munro files - Johnson, Monroe, Monroe Johnson, Descendants of Andrew Monroe - received 22 Apr 2004 - p. 104 (Reliability: 3).

    2. [S666] Descendants of Judge Frank Adair Monroe, (reprint, n.p.: n.p., 1991.).

    3. [S787] Clan Munro files - Williams, John Herbert, John Herbert Williams, Obituary and Eulogies for John Herbert Williams - 2005 (Reliability: 3).

    4. [S435] Clan Munro files - Alger, Allison Munro, Allison Munro Alger, Obituary of J. Herbert Williams - "The Times-Picayune" - 29 Jun 2005 - 30 Jun 2005 (Reliability: 3).

    5. [S435] Clan Munro files - Alger, Allison Munro, Allison Munro Alger, Eulogy of John Herbert Williams - by Eric Williams - 30 Jun 2005 (Reliability: 3).

    6. [S191] Clan Munro files - Steely, DeAnn Monroe, DeAnn Monroe Steely, Email from DeAnn Monroe Steely dated 29 Jun 2005 (Reliability: 3).