Ivers MUNROE

Ivers MUNROE

Male 1823 - 1899

Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All

  • Name  Ivers MUNROE  [1
    Born  30 May 1823  Ashburnham, Worcester Co., Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender  Male 
    Died  5 Jul 1899  Oneida, Madison Co., New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried  7 Jul 1899  Camden, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID  I8500  Munro
    Last Modified  15 Nov 2004 

    Father  Charles MUNROE,   b. 12 Sep 1781, Ashburnham, Worcester Co., Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Oct 1834, Ashburnham, Worcester Co., Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Lydia CONN,   b. Abt 1789,   d. 9 Mar 1837, Ashburnham, Worcester Co., Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  9 Jun 1808 
    Family ID  F575  Group Sheet

    Family 1  Nancy J. THOMAS,   b. Est 1825,   d. 6 Oct 1885 
    Married 
    • Ivers and Nancy had seven children. [2]
    Last Modified  20 Jan 2009 
    Family ID  F8966  Group Sheet

    Family 2  Myriah J. JENNIE,   b. Abt 1825,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified  20 Jan 2009 
    Family ID  F8967  Group Sheet

    Family 3  Lucia S. GOULD,   b. Abt 1825,   d. 1855 
    Married  20 Sep 1845  [2
    Children 
     1. Charles MUNROE,   b. Est 1847, Hacketstown, New Jersey Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Frank MUNROE,   b. Abt 1849, Of, Syracuse, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Sep 1881, Oneida, Madison Co., New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified  20 Jan 2009 
    Family ID  F8965  Group Sheet

  • Notes 
    • Ivers lived in Ashburnham, Massachusetts until 1846 when he moved to Camden, New York. There he entered the law office of Stephen Cromwell as a student. He found Mr. Cromwell to be an able instructor and a generous friend. After he was admitted to the bar in 1848, a partnership was immediately formed. As the business of the office increased, it was ably handled by Cromwell and Munroe for the next twenty years. These years were crowned by a fitting measure of success. During the Civil War, Ivers Munroe was commissioner of drafts and enrollment of the twentieth District of New York. He next went to Iowa, and from 1842 to 1862 he actively practiced his profession, first at Sidney and Tremont County and next at Clinton, the shire of Clinton County. In this field he was at once recognized as a faithful attorney and a man of character and integrity. In Clinton, he was alderman for several years, and held a prominent position in professional, public affairs and business. About 1882, he resided in Oneida, New York in impaired health.

      The following is his obituary at Oneida, New York.

      "Ivers Munroe, Descendant of Him who fired the shot Heard Round the World.

      Oneida, July 7, 1899--The funeral of Ivers Munroe was held at 11 o'clock to-day at his home, no. 6 Seneca Street, the services being conducted by the Rev. Louis H. Holden, assistant pastor of the first Presbyterian church, and at noon the body was taken to Camden for burial...The bearers were E. Eugene Coon, Allen S. Whitman, Hiram L. Rockwell, Roswell B. Downing, James B. Jenkins and E. Emmons Coe.

      Ivers Munroe was highly respected and his memory will b elong cherished on account of his good deeds. He was born at Ashburnham, Mass., in 1822. Twenty-four years later he moved to Camden, where he studied law in the office of Attorney Stephen Cromwell and was admitted to practice in 1848. He formed a partnership with Mr. Cromwell, which lasted for a period of more than twenty years. During his residence at Camden Mr. Munroe was elected Justice of the Peace, and from 1862 to 1865 he was Commissioner of Drafts for the twentieth district. His commission was signed by Secretary Stanton, and his office was at that of the Provost Marshall at Utica.

      Mr. Munroe removed to Iowa in 1868, first locating at Sidney and afterward at Clinton where he practiced his profession. While at Clinton he was elected to represent his ward in the Board of Aldermen. Coming here in 1882, he resumed his practice, and became a trustee of, and the attorney for the Oneida Savings bank. Owing to failing health, he resigned those offices last winter. He was an attendant of the First Presbyterian church, although not embraced in its membership.

      Lieut. Ebenezer Munroe, credited by historians with having fired the first gun for the American side in the war of independence, and was one of the first patriots wounded in the first battle of Lexington, was the grandsire of the deceased. Besides a widow, one daughter, Mrs. Homer Chapin of this place, and a son Charles Munroe of Hacketstown, N.J., the deceased is survived by one brother, Loring Munroe, a venerable resident of Broad Street. He was the son of Charles Munroe, a soldier during the second war with England in 1812, serving with the Ashburnham Light Infantry."

      His second wife, Nancy, was the daughter of Chaney Thomas. His third wife was Myriah J. (Jennie) Chapin. It is thought that the Mrs. Homer Chapin mentioned in the above obituary was the daughter of Myriah Chapin by a previous marriage.

      The History of Ashburnham, Massachusetts, by Ezra Stearns, 1887, says that Ivers Munro had seven children, and that only two were living in 1887.

      Ref: "Lexington, Mass. Munroes", 2nd ed. by R. S. Munroe - 11-86-16

      Compiled and edited by Allen Alger, Genealogist, Clan Munro Association, USA [3]

  • Sources 
    1. [S354] Clan Munro files - Moore, Paul Arlon, Paul Arlon Moore, History of Ashburnham - p. 834-838 (Reliability: 3).

    2. [S247] History of the Munros of Fowlis, Alexander Mackenzie, M.J.L., (Published in Inverness, Scotland by A & W Mackenzie (1898)), p. 572 (Reliability: 3).

    3. [S354] Clan Munro files - Moore, Paul Arlon, Paul Arlon Moore, History of Ashburnham - p. 834-839 (Reliability: 3).